July Excursions

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TERMS, CONDITIONS, DISCLAIMERS AND WAIVERS CAN BE FOUND ON THE “ABOUT” PAGE.

July 21
N. Santiam, Greens Bridge to Jefferson – Class 1 Whitewater – length 3.5 ± mi.
The water’s at a friendly level, so it’s time to visit this old favorite. Bring provisions and be prepared for a leisurely pace.
Jim Bradley
jim.cascadepaddlers@gmail.com

August 4
Luckiamute River, Luckiamute Landing to Buena Vista – Class A – length 3± mi.
We had a great time on the last trip, so let’s do it again. It’s a short, but slow trip, so bring adequate resources.
Jim Bradley
jim.cascadepaddlers@gmail.com

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Paddlesports, Outdoors and Wildlife

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SB 47 – Navigation Fees Become Law 
Senate Bill 47 was been signed into law on June 25th by the governor, and will come into effect this fall, with consequences to follow. Despite its being guaranteed by the terms of Oregon’s statehood, the right to freely navigate Oregon’s waters has come to an end.

It remains to be seen if the federal government will choose to defend the terms of the Admission Acts. At this point it looks unlikely that anyone will be held to account for the agency’s willful disregard for the law, and the deliberate circumventing of its intent.

North Santiam River Floats 
Zach Urness at the Statesman put together some articles on floating various stretches of the North Santiam. Here are the links:

Finally, while the article misidentified the trip as the North Santiam, when in fact it is on the main stem Santiam, here’s a trip from Jefferson to I-5: https://www.statesmanjournal.com/picture-gallery/travel/outdoors/2019/06/10/north-santiam-river-float-jefferson-5/1413299001/

Top Flat-Water Paddleboarding Destinations 
Zach also put together a list of the top 5 flat water venues, in Oregon, suitable for paddleboarding, here: https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/travel/outdoors/2019/06/20/top-5-places-flat-water-paddleboarding-oregon/1371235001/

The Wooden Canoe Heritage Association 
The WCHA, an organization dedicated to the preservation of the wood canvas canoe, held its annual confab in Ontario, last July, and Paddling Magazine was there to cover it. Their account of the event, along with rich photographs of beautiful canoes, can be found here: https://paddlingmag.com/stories/behind-40-years-of-the-wooden-canoe-heritage-association/

 

Nature and the Environment

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U.S. Beekeepers Lost 40% of Their Colonies 
The last year has been brutal for honeybees and their keepers, with American apiarists reporting they have lost 40 percent of their colonies. These are troubling losses, especially given the intense effort underway to protect the bees. The Guardian reports: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jun/19/us-beekeepers-lost-40-of-honeybee-colonies-over-past-year-survey-finds

Skin Bacteria Gives Hope Against Deadly Frog Diseases 
Amphibian populations have, for some time, been under assault from a variety of pathogens. Recent studies of frog populations have given new hope that infection rates can be staunched when the frogs have the right skin bacteria. The BBC has the story (with rich photos): https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-48707650

Forensic Veterinary Pathology and Climate Change 
As the ice retreats and the permafrost thaws, animals in Alaska are turning up with freakish pathologies. Kathy Burek, veterinary pathologist, is on the front lines in identifying and dealing with the developing threats to wildlife. Outside magazine, (via Pocket), has her story: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/the-detective-of-northern-oddities?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Oregon’s Climate Bill: The Politicians Getting Big-Polluter Bucks 
As I’m sure you heard, Oregon’s proposed legislation to fight our state’s carbon footprint failed in the legislature, this year. The Oregonian dug into the records to determine which politicians benefited the most from campaign donations originating with groups hostile to the bill. You may be surprised at who made the list: https://expo.oregonlive.com/news/g66l-2019/06/885b66848a3905/polluters-hit-by-oregon-climate-bill-gave-big-koch-industries-was-one-of-the-biggest.html

 

Health, Fitness and Safety

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Sleep Trackers May Make Insomnia Worse 
For a variety of reasons, sleep experts are questioning the role of so-called sleep trackers in achieving a healthy night’s sleep. Questions range on issues from accuracy, to validity, and psychological effects. The New York Times will tell you more: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/13/health/sleep-tracker-insomnia-orthosomnia.html

Does Using GPS Diminish Cognitive Ability? 
Evidence suggests that both perception and brain development degrade from using GPS to find your way. While devices using the global positioning system have proliferated in recent years, only now are scientists beginning to understand how using them for day-to-day navigational tasks can interfere with normal cognitive development. The Washington Post can fill you in: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/ditch-the-gps-its-ruining-your-brain/2019/06/05/29a3170e-87af-11e9-98c1-e945ae5db8fb_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_source=pocket-newtab&utm_term=.6d39f21ab61d

Common Prescription Drugs Tied to Greater Dementia Risk 
A class of commonly prescribed drugs, know as anticholinergics, have been implicated for greatly increasing the chances a patient will develop dementia. The drugs are used to treat a wide range of medical conditions, from epilepsy to depression. CNN provides more information: https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/24/health/dementia-risk-drug-study/index.html

Many Medical Devices, Practices Found Ineffective 
A recent study found nearly 400 medical devices, procedures or practices still commonly in use, despite having been shown to be ineffective. Some examples actually made matters worse for patients. Science Alert has the story: https://www.sciencealert.com/recent-study-finds-400-medical-devices-procedures-or-practices-that-are-ineffective

 

Travel and Photography

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Improvised Pouch-Rearing for Orphaned Baby Wallaby 
Heading the cute parade this month is an adorable baby wallaby that volunteers are hand rearing. The duty includes carrying the little joey around in an improvised pouch while he matures. The BBC shares: https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-england-wiltshire-48643146/orphaned-baby-wallaby-hand-reared-in-rucksack

Baby Owl Learns to Fly 
Coming in second on the cute list is this young long-eared owl, in Britain, learning to fly. Again, the BBC: https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-wales-48597711/baby-long-eared-owl-rusty-learns-to-fly-at-botanic-garden

National Geographic Travel Photo Winners 
Nat Geo’s annual travel photo contest resulted in some stunning photos winning the varied prizes. The BBC has collected them for your enjoyment: https://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-48614154

Remarkable Video of Giant Squid 
People don’t really cross paths with giant squid, as a rule. It’s probably not surprising then, that only recently was a giant squid captured on camera, in U.S. waters. The creature’s movement is exquisite as it attacks the drone filming it. The Oregonian provides: https://www.oregonlive.com/nation/2019/06/watch-scientists-capture-rare-video-of-giant-squid-in-gulf-of-mexicos-midnight-zone.html

 

Paddlesports, Outdoors and Wildlife

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SB 47: The Navigation Fee Progresses 
While the bill’s description clearly identifies it as a fee for operating a boat, the ruse that it is a fee for access appears poised to succeed. The bill has been passed by the Oregon House, and it is scheduled for its third reading before the Senate on 6/30. The only public hearing was held on February 21, apparently before the bill’s language was fully finalized.

The bill’s support appears to have run along party lines. with Democratic support and Republican opposition. It seems certain that our state’s founders would be deeply disappointed to learn their earnest efforts to secure the public’s rights have been so blithely laid asunder by their successors.

Zach Urness Floats the Smith River 
Although it is actually found in Northern California, the Smith River isn’t far away, and might be considered a Northwest river. Zach Urness at the Statesman Journal found it to be a beautiful, redwood-lined, paddler-friendly trip, as he explains: https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/travel/outdoors/2019/05/01/experience-beauty-redwood-national-park-smith-river/3619430002/

Hosmer Lake Recreation and History 
Zach Urness at the Statesman explores the history of nearby favorite, Hosmer Lake, as well as its current recreational possibilities, in this article: https://www.statesmanjournal.com/story/travel/outdoors/2016/06/25/beautiful-hosmer-lake-once-known-muddy-waters-and-trash-fish/86052426/

 

Nature and the Environment

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Corporate Cash vs. Green Ideals in the Legislature 
If you missed the Oregonian’s series on the devastating effect corporate money has had on Oregon’s environmental policies, you can find a recap, along with an examination of the prospects for change, here: https://www.oregonlive.com/politics/2019/05/campaign-cash-thwarted-oregons-green-ideals-what-the-legislature-may-and-may-not-change.html

Natural World Crisis in Five Graphics 
It isn’t always easy to put the various reports of environmental impacts, imperiled species, and resource depletion in perspective. The BBC has developed five graphics which help to visualize the issues: https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-48104037

$2-Billion Judgement Against Roundup 
For the third time in less than a year Bayer, who now owns Roundup, (Bayer having bought Monsanto who developed it), has been found liable for health effects attributed to the herbicide. The awards are climbing, and over 10,000 more lawsuits await adjudication. The BBC can fill you in: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-48262567

Plastic Recycling – The Problem Nobody Wants 
First it was China which stopped taking most plastics for recycling. The global stream of waste plastics then diverted to Malaysia, but now they don’t want it either. CNN asks, “What’s next?” https://www.cnn.com/2019/04/26/asia/malaysia-plastic-recycle-intl/index.html

 

Health, Fitness and Safety

Exercise and the Brain 
More is constantly being discovered about the links between exercise and all aspects of health. Not just a key to muscle, skeletal, and cardiovascular health, exercise plays a essential role in keeping the brain healthy, as well. Outside magazine, (via Pocket), can fill you in on some of the many ways exercise works to help what’s in your head: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/this-is-your-brain-on-exercise?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Generic Drugs – How Safe? 
In recent years, facing spiraling drug costs, many patients have turned to generic drugs to fill their prescriptions. At the same time, generic drug manufacturing has largely moved offshore, and the quality of those drugs have become suspect. Problems are said to range from inadequate potency to toxic contamination. NPR has the story: https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2019/05/16/723545864/the-generic-drugs-youre-taking-may-not-be-as-safe-or-effective-as-you-think

Iron – The New Cholesterol? 
Iron is an important nutrient, but like many minerals, too much can have a toxic effect. Today a great number of foods, like breakfast cereal, are fortified with iron. As a result, it is thought that many individuals greatly over-consume iron, and that it is causing significant, negative health impacts. Nautilus has more on the story: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/iron-is-the-new-cholesterol?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Chemicals in Bread – What the US Allows That Others Don’t 
A number of chemicals, thought to be carcinogens, banned from such use in the EU, China and Brazil, are still found in American bread. Their purposes range from whitening agents, to texturizers, to preservatives, but they all bear suspected links to cancer. Why are American bakers still using these substances? Because they’re cheaper than the safer alternatives. The Guardian reports: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/may/28/bread-additives-chemicals-us-toxic-america

 

Travel and Photography

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Oregon Zoo Has New Slam-Dunking Otter 
Eddie the otter was a long-time favorite with zoo visitors, for his willingness to perform slam dunks on his aquatic basketball set. When Eddie died, many mourned his passing, and missed his performances.

Now the zoo has a new star in Juno, a female southern sea otter, who can dunk with the best of ’em. The Oregonian introduces Juno, along with a short video of her charming antics, here: https://www.oregonlive.com/news/2019/05/the-oregon-zoo-has-a-new-slam-dunking-otter.html

 

June Excursions

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TERMS, CONDITIONS, DISCLAIMERS AND WAIVERS CAN BE FOUND ON THE “ABOUT” PAGE.

June 16
Willamette River, Independence to Soc. Sec. Park – Class A – length 4 miles
A short, scenic trip, close to home so Dad can have some fun and still have time for the family stuff.
Jim Bradley
jim.cascadepaddlers@gmail.com

June 30
Luckiamute River, Luckiamute Landing to Buena Vista – Class A – length 3± miles
On the last trip we found the river awash in green and at a very friendly level. Let’s go again, before anything changes.
Jim Bradley
jim.cascadepaddlers@gmail.com